Living with a Child-Like Passion

One of the greatest struggles of my life is figuring out how to motivate myself to exercise. I don’t. I am in my late thirties and I have gained 75 pounds from when I was a fit 18 year old just graduating from high school. Back then, I played all the time. It came easy to me for two reasons: 1. I played on the high school football team; 2. I simply loved playing sports. I was often out running around and playing with friends. Whether it was basketball, riding my bike, volleyball, or whatever other physical activity I could find, I didn’t tell myself to exercise, I simply naturally was active all the time. As a child, it was common for me to spend hours playing backyard football with my friends. I recall being totally exhausted and barely able to breath, and then lining up for the next play to try to score the next big touchdown. It was a regular part of my life. Children have a natural ability to play hard and love life that adults seem to completely lack.

We live in Michigan, where there is snow in the winter. This year, we did not get our first accumulation of snowfall until late January. It was kind of strange but, as an adult, very pleasant to not have to deal with snow until this late into the winter. My children, however, felt differently. They lamented the lack of snow and couldn’t wait for it to come. They wanted to go outside in it and make a snow fort and go sledding.

The snow finally came on Saturday. Just like clockwork the kids wanted to go outside and play in it. And the onslaught of requests to take them sledding commenced. Given that the snow came on a Saturday, I had a lot of discretionary time and could have easily taken the kids sledding. It’s what a good dad would do right? The problem is, I absolutely did not feel like going out in the cold and taking them sledding. My oldest son kept asking me. I kept giving the answer that all adults use when they don’t want to do something for their children but have no good reason for it except they are being lazy…”I’ll think about it.” The problem with “I’ll think about it” is that the kids see that as a weakness which they can exploit. And so the requests from the children intensified.

As the day went on, it became apparent that my kids really did want to go sledding as their requests turned into pleas. We only have one sled, so with 4 children they even devised a plan that included me driving them to the dollar store, and the two older boys using their money to buy their own sleds on the way to the sledding hill. It obviously meant a lot to them that I take them sledding. But I DID NOT FEEL LIKE IT AT ALL.

Suddenly something hit me.

I have an opportunity to be a blessing to my children and take them sledding. They are asking me to go out and have fun with them. And I am selfishly rejecting their requests. I began realizing that my laziness and selfishness was depriving them of the opportunity to express their natural child-like wonder, but also depriving me of that same thing as well. If I didn’t take them, I was going to deeply regret it later. What is it about adults that we completely lose the ability to know how to have fun and love life to the fullest? I decided to die to myself and take them sledding. Dread it as I did, I had to do it. They are kids. They deserved the chance to express their kid-ness after 2 snow-less months in Michigan winter.

Once I gave in to their requests and died to my own laziness and selfishness, I was able to remember. I remembered the wonder and love of life with which kids live naturally. As we arrived at the sledding hill near our house, the three oldest immediately began sledding down the hill on their sleds like it was as natural as eating or breathing. I remembered how often I loved going sledding as a kid and how naturally it came to me. I remembered what life was like before I became a boring adult that lazily sits inside when it snows instead of going out to build snow forts and endure the cold for the fun of being out in the snow.

sledding
Sledding January 19th, 2019

Ironically, as this life lesson hit me, I was scheduled to begin volunteering at my church youth group the next day for the Sunday evening youth group meetings. The boys in attendance spent their free time running around the church building playing tag. As I discussed the evening with one of the regular youth group volunteers I told them I was surprised that the kids didn’t utilize the fuse ball table, the air hockey table, and the pool table more. And she told me the boys generally just like to run around, and around, and around. Of course that is what it looks like to adults. But to those boys they are probably actually playing a game with rules imperceptible to us adults. It is as if once you get a mortgage and car payments you lose the ability to have fun. Again I was faced with how much I have changed since becoming a bill-burdened adult, and was reminded what life was like when I was just a kid who loved to run and play with my friends.

There is a huge life lesson in all of this. Maybe we struggle to motivate ourselves to exercise because we are doing it for the wrong reason. Maybe we shouldn’t even think of it as exercise. My doctor, when talking to me about my need to exercise more, told me that instead of getting a gym membership and never using it, I should think of an activity I like to do such as soccer, basketball, swimming, or whatever, and find a local club that I can sign up to join to do that activity with other adults. I think he is on to something. Kids are typically more fit. I think one of the reasons for this is because they don’t tell themselves they need to go to the gym to exercise, but instead just run after life with all their might. They love life. They play and they play hard. They remember what fun it is to fly down a hill with snow spraying in their face. They remember the joy of running around with their friends and trying to win whatever game it is they are playing. Maybe we need to stop thinking that we should exercise because it is healthy, and just live life more fully, having fun because we still can.

Should You Believe in Yourself?

Belief is a powerful thing. What we believe about any one thing will directly affect how we interact with that thing. If I believe the floor is sturdy, I will stand on it without questioning or even thinking of its integrity. If I believe something is dangerous, even if it’s not, I will be more careful when interacting with that thing. An example of this is being under a car. No matter how strong, sturdy, or secure a car is when it is up on a lift or pulled up on a set of ramps, I can’t seem to shake my fear of it falling on me when I am underneath it. Recently I was changing the oil on my Ford Explorer, which has tires big enough that I can crawl underneath the vehicle without having to lift it at all. Even though the truck was not lifted and was resting on its tires on the ground, when I was underneath it draining the oil, I could not shake my fear that the tires were going to burst in that moment and the truck was going to fall on me and crush me. What we believe about anything affects how we act when interacting with it.

This is also true about what we believe about ourselves. When we believe we can do something, we will try it. When we believe we can’t do something, we will never try it or give up quickly. This is why, as a teacher, I often saw my students, and still see my own children, quickly give up when working on something that is difficult and then just sit there, waiting for “help” instead of struggling and trying on their own. Similarly, we humans foolishly choose paths in life too often based on these false perceptions about what we believe is true about ourselves, which have no basis in reality. I have made many life decisions in the past 20 years of my life based on a false understanding I had about myself which I now call the poverty mindset, which was based entirely on a myth that I was not worthy to be counted as successful by society’s standards.

That is what the content of this blog symbolizes for me. An internal change in my beliefs about myself.

Believe in yourself. For some of you that seems like not a very profound statement. Not me. As a Christian for most of my life, I have always wanted to be careful to not ascribe to statements that would compete with all glory going to God. I used to go to a church that was very intent on identifying the right things to say, and which highlighted a very close link between your beliefs and your actions and words. This church was full of wonderful people and I learned much and developed a love of Jesus there that I never had before. However, this church also instilled in me an overly critical mindset. When someone would say something like “Believe in yourself.” I was trained to instantly identify that as a heretical statement. For, humans are only sinful wretches and offer nothing good. We shouldn’t believe in ourselves, we should believe in Jesus; He is the only one worthy of our trust.

Like a good follower, I always reacted to the “Believe in yourself” statement with instant criticism. I would not fall into that trap of believing in yourself. No way. The problem with my commitment to never condone the “believe in yourself” mantra is that I have also always struggled with lack of confidence around fellow adults, especially other guys. No matter how hard I tried, I couldn’t shake this lack of confidence.

I believe there is a direct link between my religiously-based rejection of “Believe in yourself” and my lack of confidence. Could it be that it is okay to “Believe in yourself” and still be a faithful Christian who wants to glorify Jesus in all you do?

Not too long ago, as I wrote about in a previous post, I stumbled upon the story of how Matt Nagy, who was just voted NFL Coach of the Year in his first season as the Chicago Bears head coach, rose to become an NFL football coach. Nagy’s story and example of how he lives his life has been inspiring to me. During games he carries with him a large laminated play-calling sheet. In big words in one corner are the words, “BE YOU!”. He told some reporters that he tries to live by that saying. That if he is going to fail he will fail giving it his all while being who he truly is. That struck a chord with me, and continued me on an exciting journey. I began more deeply reflecting on my life and who I am and how I got here.

In my full time job I am a Realtor. I used to be a middle and high school teacher, but left teaching for various reasons two years ago to be a full time Realtor. Having always struggled with self-confidence, especially around other guys, I felt very frustrated with myself that I had not accomplished more in my life and gone further in any given career.   As I began to self-reflect with honesty and began asking myself some hard questions, I began to realize that I had what I call a poverty mindset, and this poverty mindset was limiting my ability to grow.

A story about an encounter I had with someone while I was serving with my wife in the church nursery caring for babies on a Sunday morning best captures one of the major causes of my confidence struggles, and sheds light on the solution. As I was speaking with a fellow church member who was serving in the nursery with us, he was telling me about being unemployed and how hard that had been for him. At the time, I was a teacher at a small Christian school making $20,000 per year with no benefits. My wife worked as a stay-at-home mom and we had two boys under the age of 5. We struggled to pay the bills. As this guy was telling me about his own struggle of unemployment, he said, “This year has been hard. It is the first time in my life that I have never made at least $100,000 in a year.” My jaw dropped. I was working 50+ hours per week making a poverty income and had to pick up a job stocking shelves at night and on the weekends for an additional 15 to 20 hours per week just to pay our bills, and this dude is complaining to me that he hasn’t made $100,000 this year?! Who does he think he is?! How arrogant of him to say that to me! Doesn’t he know who he is talking to? Those were my thoughts after his comment.

For several years after that I was pretty ticked off at the guy. You see, when someone believes it is wrong to “Believe in yourself.” and they struggle with self-confidence, they put powerful and low limits on what they can accomplish. This was an amazing scene. The other guy believed in himself and I didn’t believe in myself. So his comment was very offensive to me because I did not believe that I would ever make that much money in my life.

My family grew up poor by American standards. My father never finished high school. He was a very good man who did the best he knew how to care for and provide for his family, but he was not very well equipped. We moved from house to house growing up. We would get behind in rent and we would be forced to move to a new rental home. Consequently I changed school districts about every 1 to 2 years. By the time I was in 8th grade I had been in 6 different school districts. Consequently my grades were also bad. My dad did not effectively teach me to be disciplined. My mother worked very hard to teach me self-discipline but I was a stubborn, resistant child. Furthermore, I remember there were many times when our power was shut off for days or weeks at a time, or we had no hot water and we had to boil water to take a sponge bath or take a cold shower.

My dad struggled with a lot of insecurity as well. He was often borrowing money from people and unable to pay it back. He created a low self-image for himself and our family and projected that low self-image onto others. I recall one time I was sitting in the bleachers around 12 years old at a church softball game in which my dad was playing. A couple of young men in their early twenties sitting right in front of me began making fun of my dad behind his back unaware of my presence. When they realized I was sitting behind them and could hear them, they seemed embarrassed but said nothing to me. I understood who we were and that identity became my identity. When my dad was finally able to buy a home for the first time when I was in high school, he then had it repossessed when I was 19 years old. This way of life was generated out of a way of thinking within my dad, and I was brought up in that same way.

So when this man in the nursery lamented having not made $100,000 for the first time in his life, it offended me because he was supposed to know what I already believed, that he was talking to a failure whose lot in life was to always struggle to provide for his family. That was the way I saw myself. I wouldn’t dare to allow myself to believe I could make $100,000 per year, and if I did dare to think that might be possible, I certainly wouldn’t let anyone else know I was thinking it. They might mock me and think I was crazy. After all, it is me we are talking about here.

This whole mindset was supported out of a belief that it is wrong to “believe in yourself.” I would never let myself ascribe to the “believe in yourself” mantra. It was a couple of years after the $100,000 comment that I began to slowly realize that I am no different than the other guy, and I can give myself permission to think big and dream big. I continued to teach another 5 years at two other schools before I decided that if I was ever going to break this low self-image, and earn enough money to truly provide for my family, that I would have to leave the teaching profession altogether and pursue a career which had an uncapped earning potential. So I became a full time realtor. Ever since then I have been on a journey of slowly identifying ways I am still living in the self-inflected poverty mindset and trying to break down those false barriers I have constructed preventing my own success.

Then I learned of Matt Nagy and his rise to head coach. Nagy was selling homes as a realtor when he had a chance to become an assistant coach in the NFL. Something about his “Be You” slogan, his self-confidence, and his risk-taking struck a chord with me. Around the same time, I stumbled across a book entitled The 15 Invaluable Laws of Growth by a Christian man named John Maxwell. In the book, he urges his readers to believe they are dignified humans with a lot more potential than they realize. He spends a lot of time encouraging his readers to believe in themselves. This challenged me. How can a Christian writer be saying we should believe in ourselves. Believe in Yourself? Could it be that it is okay for me to believe in myself. That I can do that without compromising my faith in Jesus.

That I can confess to be a sinner in need of God’s grace while also believing I am a human created by a creative God who has given me certain gifts and qualities that are good and worthy to be developed. Yes! Something clicked. 

When I realized it was okay to be a Christian and still believe in myself, my gifts and abilities, and that I have great potential to accomplish great things, it was like something clicked inside of me. The potential to excel and accomplish great things, and earn enough to provide for my family has always been there but I lacked the ability to access it. I suspect I will be continuing to gradually uncover ways I have limited myself by believing something was impossible for me. I suppose living in the reality that it is okay to believe in yourself will be a lifelong journey in which I have to uncover many old barriers I need to break down, but I now have access to the right mindset to break down those barriers. If you or someone you know has struggled to believe in yourself/themselves, I hope this post will be an encouragement to you. I hope you will realize that no matter where you come from, you truly are a person created by God with dignity and the potential to do more than you realize. The first or next step for you just might be to believe in yourself.

Have You Ever Stopped to Notice?

Aren’t wheel barrows glorious? My favorite poem is about a wheel barrow.. sort of. If the length of a poem was any indicator of how intellectual you are, then I suppose I am not very intellectual. The Red Wheel Barrow is only 16 words long. It’s my favorite poem because it is a reminder to me to notice the beauty all around, and to notice the “small” things as blessings in my life.

“The Red Wheel Barrow” by William Carlos Williams

So much depends

upon

The red wheel

barrow

Glazed with rain

water

Beside the white

Chickens

I know, short right? William Carlos Williams is an accomplished poet. And yet at first glance this poem seems so….unpoetic.

But I have always loved this poem. Something about it strikes me to the core. It excites me. You see I have pondered much about its meaning. “So much depends” suggests that there are many blessings that are symbolized by the red wheel barrow sitting outside next to the chickens. It reminds me to stop and notice the blessings I have. This tool that is used for work is worn, is not properly appreciated as it is left outside to get rained on. And yet, so much depends upon it. It is something that is taken for granted, but the poet decided it was important enough to stop and write a shockingly short poem about it.

It’s a reminder to me to remember to pause my life regularly to appreciate things which I typically forget to appreciate. Sadly, we humans can often forget to appreciate the beauty and blessing of things that we have, things we should be appreciating: our children, our home, the trees, the sky, the crisp cool air in the morning, the birds chirping as the sun rises, our coffee (oh wait, we are probably pretty good about appreciating that), our work, forgiveness in Christ.

In John Piper’s article from desiringgod.org entitled, “10 Resolutions for Mental Health” he says the following for resolution number 6, “I shall open my eyes and ears. Once every day I shall simply stare at a tree, a flower, a cloud, or a person. I shall not then be concerned at all to ask what they are but simply be glad that they are. I shall joyfully allow them the mystery of what Lewis calls their “divine, magical, terrifying and ecstatic” existence.”

Let us live today with renewed inspired resolve by remembering to pause and notice the beauty and wonder of the things in our life which we normally take for granted. Remember to notice.

Small Stones Make Long-Lasting Ripples: How A Small Part of Your Day Is Either Helping or Hurting You.

water wave circle drop of water
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Have you ever thrown stones in a lake? For some reason it seems to be one of the greatest joys of boyhood. One of the many things I love doing with my boys is going hiking at local parks. Inevitably, when we come to the edge of a lake, pond, or river, they begin passionately looking for stashes of stones in the ground that they can throw into the water. A competition ensues to see who is able to throw a stone the furthest or who can skip a rock the most times. But have you ever watched what happens after the stone lands in the water? Of course you know that it creates ripples in the water that gradually expand out from the point at which the stone first entered the surface of the water. But have you ever stopped to take a moment to watch it? The ripples, even from a small stone, carry on and effect the water surprisingly far away from the point of entrance of the stone. There is much we can learn about that concept when we apply it to our life. Our lives are made up of a collection of small decisions which create ripple effects upon the lake of our entire life. One of these small daily decisions that has huge impacts on whether we are making progress toward our life goals or moving backwards away from our goals is how we handle our bedtime routine.

Of course, I am assuming you are already on a path of living on purpose or living with what I have called inspired resolve. This means you have written down your life purpose and have written some lofty life goals for yourself which are directly connected to your life purpose. If you have not done that yet, then it won’t really matter to you one way or another whether you have a productive bedtime routine or not. And your bedtime routine will also depend on if you are single, married, living with a roommate, have children or not, etc. But make no mistake, we can trace the ripples that are created by our bedtime routines.

I have done a lot of reading about what makes successful people stand out from those who have no direction or are unsuccessful. There are many things that make them stand out, one of the most important being how they spend their early mornings. Successful people see their mornings as invaluable parts of their day. Intentionally living the early morning part of your day is critical to living your life with inspired resolve and growing towards accomplishing your life goals.

Imagine going through your life always sleeping in until the last possible minute before you have to get up to get somewhere on time. For some of you, you don’t have to imagine. You start your day out stressed, hurried, eating an unhealthy breakfast if you eat one at all. You are speeding to get to work or school, trying to see how many traffic laws you can come close to breaking without getting pulled over. You are wearing a wrinkled shirt because you had no time to iron. You are playing catch up with every aspect of your day from the moment you awake. Sounds unpleasant right?

Now imagine you wake up early, let’s say 5:00 am for the purpose of this conversation. You have a rigidly structured morning routine which includes a time of prayer and inspirational reading, stretching, exercise, reviewing your plans and goals for the day, and giving yourself plenty of time to begin your work. As you sit in the quietness of the early morning before other members of the home have awaken, you hear the birds begin to chirp while you read and drink your coffee. You get ready with plenty of time to spare. You leave for work with plenty of time to be a few minutes early. You are calm, already feel productive for the day, and feel physically and emotionally refreshed and confident as you set out to live your day with inspired resolve.

Which type of day would you like to live? I assume you said the second one, the one where you awoke early and were productive.

Let me ask you another question: What is your normal bedtime routine? Do you have a set bedtime for yourself or do you go to bed when you are just too tired to stay awake any longer. Do you watch tv or movies in bed? Do you stay awake late into the night? Remember you most likely already acknowledged the fact that you would like to live a life of inspired resolve, awaking early every morning with purpose and intention.

The way we spend our mornings creates ripples throughout our entire day, and then those days turn into weeks, months, years, and a lifetime. The way you wake up each morning is directly related to whether you are living your life accomplishing your goals and, ultimately, your purpose in life.

If you, like me, see the value of starting each day early and living on purpose, you need to realize that it requires you to have an equally intentional and purposeful bedtime routine the night before. Something that my wife and I got into the bad habit of doing is going to bed every night with a digital device and watching our favorite shows on Netflix until we couldn’t stay awake any longer. This became very harmful to our relationship and to our overall life. We both found it very difficult to get up in the morning even though we both wanted to live our early mornings with inspired resolve. We have decided to commit to no longer ending our day this way.

My new routine is to sit down some time in the late afternoon or early evening (before I am too tired) and review what I accomplished that day and what I want to accomplish the next day. I then write out my agenda for the next day with all the tasks I want to finish carefully planned out. I have a very strict bedtime of 10pm so that I can be sure to wake up at 4:15am, my desired wake up time. Some days I am not faithful at this routine, but I am growing. I review my goals every night as a reminder about why I want to do this so that when the temptation comes to break this routine, I am able to remember what inspires me.

Just like my boys and I throwing stones in a lake and creating ripples that effect the water far away from where the stone fell in, we are constantly making ripples in our life with our daily choices. It is entirely up to you how you want your life to go. You just have to realize that the ripples you are living in today are a direct result of the stones you threw days, weeks, months, and years ago. And if you don’t like how your life is going today, then maybe you should begin to start throwing different kinds of stones in new places in your life. The ripples always come, but you get to dictate where and how.

 

 

Your Phone’s Alarm Clock Doesn’t Work.

In a previous post here, I discussed the importance of having restraint when using social media. Social media can become harmfully, excessively intrusive in our daily lives. If you read that post, you know that I have deleted my fb page. However, as a Realtor and a writer, I have to maintain some connectedness on the internet. Having abandoned facebook, I find I have more time available for other things. While I have more time, the temptation to be overly connected to my digital devices continues. I have realized my phone is hurting me in ways I thought it was helping.

As I went to bed last night, I set the time on my alarm clock to 4am (Yes, even on a Saturday, especially on a Saturday). I was eager to get right to work on my writing and my real estate work. However, I made one critical mistake as I fell asleep. I forgot to properly set my alarm.

You see, the night I deleted my facebook account, I also drove up to the local Meijer around 10pm, and bought a stand alone alarm clock. From the moment I decided I needed to buy a stand-alone alarm clock to the moment I came home with one in hand, there were many obstacles which could have deterred me from accomplishing this mission.

This was a very critical step in my journey to live with inspired resolve. I couldn’t let the time of night, or the fact that the electronics department was closed for the night, or the fact that some of the employees whose help I sought were uninterested in helping me stop me from doing what I felt inspired in that moment to do. I know myself well enough to know that if I did not go buy that alarm clock in that moment, I would probably never do it. But why was buying an alarm clock such an important step?

I have become convinced that if I want to live with inspired resolve, I must be less connected to the distraction of the internet and be more present in the here and now of my life. The internet has been a force for much good in the world since its beginning, but it has also become a monstrous form of living a distracted life.

Compare how the average American today spends his free time versus the average American two hundred years ago. The average American was probably working in his field, living a life of hard work and benefiting from all one can learn from reaping and sowing. If he had any free time, he was probably spending it writing letters, having face to face conversations with others, or reading classic works of literature.

How often do you spend time with a friend or loved one and give that person more than 3 to 5 minutes of thoughtful, intentional, undivided attention through listening and having discourse without ever looking at or thinking about your phone? How much time do you spend reading classic literature versus keeping your brain preoccupied or distracted on sites like Pinterest, facebook, instagram, etc. If you are like me, your answers to those questions are not very encouraging.

I got to the point with my phone that I was always aware of its whereabouts while I slept during the night. I needed my phone as an alarm clock. So I made sure it was well-charged and close by me every night before I fell asleep. I had this strange awareness of my phone’s presence at my bedside at all times. Even though I always try to wake up between 4am and 5:30am, using the phone as my way of doing that was actually hurting me. When I woke up I was faced with immediate distraction; the very thing I depended upon to wake up early to be productive is the thing that overwhelmingly tempted me with instant distraction. I woke up to spend the early morning in prayer, exercise, reading, and other early morning productive activities, and often found myself instead sitting and reading news stories or social media posts which, when I am honest with myself, are very irrelevant to me and my life.

So by using my phone as an alarm clock, I had to literally pick up the distraction and literally hold it in my hand. If I had any hope of being productive each morning, I instantly upon waking, had to be faced with a powerful temptation to be distracted and then make an active choice to deny that temptation. Why would I put myself in such a position every morning.

It was time to separate my phone from my alarm clock. It was time to put my phone to bed every night in a place that was not my bedroom. So with the purchase of a new inexpensive and simple alarm clock is the beginning of a new bedtime routine.

With a new alarm clock, it is important to remember to actually execute the change with intention and resolve. Last night, I set my wake up time for 4am. But I didn’t wake up until 7am. I was so disappointed when I discovered I overslept and perplexed about what happened. The alarm clock seemed ineffective and it was only day two.

As I got going, however, I realized what happened. When I depended on my phone as an alarm clock, I never had to reset the alarm or turn the alarm back on each night. However, my new alarm clock is different. Each night it must be switched back to the “on” position, and each morning when it goes off, I literally need to turn it “off”.

I couldn’t be more excited to have such a seemingly primitive device in the 2019 world of high tech. With this device, I am removing a deeply detrimental temptation to waste time each morning, and am forced to be more intentional about my bedtime and wake up routine. And that is what living with inspired resolve is all about…being intentional.

If you can relate to the problem of using your phone as your alarm clock, or it you want to join me in making this change, leave a comment below to let me know.

Break Free from Our Self-Adorned Chains

As I have grown older (Not a young buck anymore), I’ve increasingly realized how much I’ve placed false limitations on myself due to my own self-perception. Too often I have enslaved myself to the subtle whisper in my head of the words “I can’t…”. There is so much I have not done in my life because I didn’t believe I could do it. And most of the time I didn’t even realize I was limiting myself in this way. It seems like so often lately I have uncovered a new self-limitation that has held me back in life.

No more.

One example of this is becoming a musician. My wife (of 15 years as I am typing this) is a very gifted and well-known (in our small circles) pianist and piano teacher. And yet I can’t play anything on the piano even though I have a piano teacher as my best friend. Why? Because I have always lived believing that I am unable to learn it. “I can’t play the piano. I wish I could but I can’t.”

Now I am asking myself, “Why not?”

So I went to the music store and bought myself an adult beginner book. I will play the piano darn it!

Now its your turn…

What is one thing in your life that you have limited yourself in doing because you didn’t believe you could do it? 

Leave your answers in the comments section.

I look forward to reading them.

And don’t forget to resolve to live inspired.

Disconnecting is The First Step to Living with Inspired Resolve

The first step I am taking in my resolve to live an inspired life is to do a little disconnecting. But it is not without good reason. Before I go any further, let me explain what I mean by “disconnecting”. While I would love to be able to completely and totally disconnect (get rid of my home wifi, all digital devices, my mobile phone, all social media accounts) my job requires me to be connected. However, there is one very important area in which I have taken the step to disconnect, and will chronicle how that is going throughout the next 30 days.

As a lifelong Chicago Bears fan, I am very excited my team has finally made the playoffs and have a good chance to make it to the Super Bowl this year. This is due in large part to their new coach, Matt Nagy. The more I learn about this guy, the more I am inspired by him. You see, Matt Nagy’s path is very non-conventional. After playing football in the now-shuttered Arena Football League, he decided to give up his dreams of football and get a regular job in the business world. He started selling new homes. However, when unpaid and low-paid opportunities popped up with the Philadelphia Eagles, he pursued them. Most people would not have taken the risk. (He had to start out with a pay cut of more than 50%). But he did. And now he is on track to possibly become the NFL Coach of the Year, turning around a Bears team with 5 wins, 11 losses last year to 12-4 this year, divisional champions, and a playoff berth. Matt Nagy chose to buck conventional wisdom and take a chance. He lived with inspired resolve.

Nagy’s example caused me to stop and ask the question: Is there some lifelong dream or passion in my life which I have put to death long ago because I believed the lie that I could never do it? As I pondered this question, I came across another interesting man who lives his life with inspired resolve. Daron K Roberts was a student at Harvard Law School. He was set to start a promising and lucrative law career. One day a friend invited him to work at a football camp for a few weeks. He fell in love with coaching football and the opportunity coaching could provide to inspire young men. He abandoned his law career and set out to become an NFL Coach. I couldn’t believe it! He resolved to pursue what inspired him. I had to learn more about this man.

After working long hard hours for little or no pay as an NFL coaching intern, Daron K Roberts eventually landed a position as an assistant NFL coach. After coaching in the NFL for several years, he now lectures at the University of Texas and is the founding director of The Center for Sports Leadership and Innovation and the author of a book called Call an Audible: Let My Pivot from Harvard Law to NFL Coach Inspire Your Transition. As I learned more about Daron K Roberts, I watched a talk he gave to a room of young college students about living with purpose. His first point in that talk was “Script don’t Scroll.” He emphasized the importance of not wasting your days away every day being closely connected to your phone scrolling through all the latest social media platforms to see what interesting thing the platform thinks you need to know next.

This got me thinking about my own social media usage throughout each day. My social media platform of choice is was facebook. I would look at it so often throughout the day that I got to a point where if I was bored, I would check fb. I am not sure but I would guess that I checked facebook probably more than 50 times per day. I would check it everywhere-in the bathroom, at my office, in line at the grocery store, in my living room after dinner when my kids were all around me and longed for my full attention, and everywhere else. The most concerning thing about this as I thought about it was (1) that I often was mindlessly scrolling through my feed while in the presence of others who need and wanted my full attention, and (2) that I was constantly connected to it. I would typically check facebook (for no good reason) within 15-30 minutes of waking up in the morning.

You may have seen this video, which has gone viral on social media, in which Simon Sinek discusses the way social media is damaging us and our whole culture. If you haven’t seen it, it is very much worth 15 minutes to watch. In it he discusses the importance of putting down our phones, not keeping them by our bed as an alarm clock, and keeping our social media usage limited. The video is enlightening and inspiring. I have seen it 3 or 4 times over the past year or two. And every time I see it, I decide I am going to delete my facebook account. And I never do.

However, after learning about Matt Nagy’s and Daron K Roberts’ intentionality, purpose, and resolve to live inspired, and being challenged by Roberts to stop scrolling and instead live a daily life of purpose, I have decided to delete my facebook account. Last night, I went into my fb settings and selected the button to create a temporary file which catalogued all my previous fb usage so that I have a record of my past posts, photos, and videos. Then I downloaded the file and clicked to delete my account. Facebook has it set up to have my information active and visible on facebook for 30 days to give me a chance to change my mind. This time facebook will not be getting me back though. I am choosing to stop scrolling and instead to script my life. I am resolving to live inspired. Facebook, by its very nature, builds into you a mindset of reacting to life instead of scripting your life. You have very little control as fb leaves you addicted to more of the same. The scrolling action invites a hunger for more scrolling. No longer will that be part of my life. I choose to be more present with the people around me and to live intentionally.

The most interesting thing about deleting my fb account is that I have had these urges to pick up my phone and check fb or to post an interesting article I found on it. At least twice in the 12 hours since I have deleted my fb account, I have come across an interesting article and began the steps of copying the url so I could share it on fb. It is amazing how much facebook has built itself its own little cozy place in my head. I have now kicked it out and it has no home with me now.

Tomorrow I will write about what other steps I am taking this month to live with inspired resolve and disconnect more from the chains of technology that occupy too much of my time. I hope you will join me and you too will live your life in 2019 with inspired resolve.

Please leave your comments. I would love to hear from you.